Sunday, February 13, 2011

Lesson 2

Now, for everyone who still hasn't given up, running scared of the difficulty of the Japanese language, here comes Lesson 2. And if you thought we're gonna start learning words or grammar now, you're wrong - we're still not done with the writing systems. No, we're not starting Kanji or anything, we're still at Hiragana and Katakana :) Is there anyone who's memorized them by any chance? Didn't think so. I'm kidding of course, feel free to boast about your accomiplishments in the comments. Today's lesson is going to be short and easy. Did I hear someone say "hurray"?


In today's lesson we're gonna  learn how to get some additional syllables that aren't in the tables. That's pretty simple - just add two little strokes (or just dots, as my Japanese teacher did) and the sounds change as follows:

K  becomes G,
S      --->     Z
T      --->     D
H      --->     B

This way the kana ka, ki, ku, ke, ko become ga, gi, gu, ge, go and so on. It looks like that.

 か  =>  が 
  => ぎ 
く   =>  ぐ  
け   =>  げ 
こ  =>  ご 


There are a few exeptions however. When you put two dots on SHI, instead of ZI, it becomes JI, and both SU and TSU become ZU. Usually, the ZU sound is represented by SU with two dots.


Only for the kana starting with H there is another way you can change them, and that is by adding a small circle in the place of the two dots. Then H changes into P. (example: ha => pa)

 は  => ぱ

This way of changing the kana applies to both Hiragana and Katakana.

Since I said this lesson was going to be short, and it turned out a little longer, I'm going to stop here to make sure I don't overload your brains with new information. For everyone who still hasn't given up: 

Good job, see you again next time!


51 comments:

  1. Great Lesson! Thanks for the advice!

    ReplyDelete
  2. those lessons are coming fast, can't keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Do you know if anywhere sells Kana or Kanji keyboards? Using the on-screen keyboard is really annoying!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Still working on the memorization of Hiragana, haha. Gotta add the g, z, d, b, and p syllables to my flash cards eventually. Good lesson, nice review.

    ReplyDelete
  5. @Gracie Flaming

    Hm, onscreen keyboard? If you simply use the Japanese font that comes with Vitsa/ Win 7, you can write in latin letters and it automatically changes it into kana, for the kanji you have to cycle through with spacebar, but then again, kanji won't be able to fit on any keyboard.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'll try these out tonight. Also an explanation of why Japanese people have such trouble pronouncing english "L" sounds would be pretty interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The explanation was in the previous post, but what the heck, here it is again - they simply don't have the L sound in their language, so they pronounce both the words with R and with L using R. So when they start learning English they either keep using R instead of L, or the opposite - start substituting every R they see with L. You can rarely see a Japanese people who can speak proper English.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Nice i think i am getting the hang of it now

    ReplyDelete
  9. This isnt as hard as i thought itd be

    ReplyDelete
  10. Again another excellent post for the learning.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I really really like this blog ill practice before your next post

    ReplyDelete
  12. Now the most difficult part of every language starts: grammar

    I will try to keep up. Unfortunately I have a busy week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hey, nice one. How about getting your followers some homework? Like 'memorize katakana in a week' ;) Regards.

    ReplyDelete
  14. good efforts. I'll get working hard and then when I visit Japan I'll have something to say :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Trying to follow, but man is this a hard language.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Would it be possible at some time in the future for you to embed a YouTube video with the proper pronunciations? Writing is fine, but speaking is MUCH better.

    ReplyDelete
  17. to understand my psp truely.. this comes in handy

    ReplyDelete
  18. If you keep this up then I won't have to take that japanese course

    ReplyDelete
  19. helpful stuff, hoping to do to Tokyo soon this might help.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Helpful, my friend who wants to study japanese actually reads this blog on a daily basis I think.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I am actually starting to get the hand of this.... amazing job!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Awesome lesson. I'll try to keep up with you.

    ReplyDelete
  23. awsome advice... cant wait until next lesson

    ReplyDelete
  24. You;re a great teacher, it's not so hard when broken down the way you do.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I might send this blog link to a friend who has been studying Japanese.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Love your posts, but how'd you get so good at Japanese?

    ReplyDelete
  27. I still try to comprehend this but learning all this would take too long for me. Guess i have to keep trying!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Loving these lessons, waiting for more, thanks a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  29. I can't memberize the symbols :p. Need to put more time in this one.

    ReplyDelete
  30. i have to write this down, awesome post like always!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Japanase is indeed really hard. Thanks for this quality post man.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Watashi wa tabete imas. thats all i got so far.

    ReplyDelete
  33. You really know your stuff! Keep this coming - will be fluent in no time ;)

    ReplyDelete
  34. thanks a lot, really well prepared! keep it up :)

    ReplyDelete
  35. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  36. That's a great idea to share that kind of lessons !

    ReplyDelete
  37. wow this is an awesome idea for a blog!
    good luck from secretpctips.com

    ReplyDelete
  38. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Great lesson bro but it was not easy as you promised. JK :)

    ReplyDelete